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February 20, 2013
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Margot Font Specimen by nymphont Margot Font Specimen by nymphont
This is a type specimen poster I created for Margot, a typeface and font family I created.
This poster is #2 out of the four Margot type specimen posters in this series.
Download the Margot font family and view the type specimen #1:[link]
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:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2013  Professional General Artist
Awesome presentation!
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:iconnymphont:
nymphont Featured By Owner Mar 3, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks so much, once again I heeded your suggestion on making larger presentation graphic, and I intend continue doing so whenever possible. There was so much I wanted to display of Margot, I probably should have gone even larger with this graphic!

What I like about this is that it's not overtly feminine or "girly," as most of my personal work is. Margot the font might be a little bit on the softer side, but I was still able to keep this illustration free of rainbow and pink color schemes. :D
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:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Mar 3, 2013  Professional General Artist
I don't think the font is that feminine. I think the colors you selected to present the typeface are perfect to express its intricate flavor.
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:iconnymphont:
nymphont Featured By Owner Mar 4, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Thank you :)
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:iconjelloween:
jelloween Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2013  Hobbyist Interface Designer
Very pretty and original :heart: It must've been so much work to create all those non-Latin characters! :faint:
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:iconnymphont:
nymphont Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Thank you so much! Coming from such a talented designer, it really means a lot. Originality is important to me, so for me it is wonderful for that to be noticed in my work. It was a lot of work to make the non-Latin characters, but a lot of fun too.

Since I do not use them and the majority of Latin characters with diacritical marks, I do make mistakes with my representations of them sometimes, but I have learned a lot since I began.

Thanks again for your kind words on this, I am SO glad to hear it.
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:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2013  Professional General Artist
I couldn't judge Cyrillic or Greek (the Margot style fits the Greek alphabet incredibly well, by the way) but I can say something about Polish letters. It seems you're using acute accents but as far as I know Polish and other Slavic languages don't use the acute accents. They use the kreska. Here's the difference between the two described: [link]

Some professional typefaces are programmed to detect the language and replace the acute with a kreska while others simply offer an alternate set. In any case, for the sake of covering all the main languages, you may want to include the kreska.

Also check out the other links at the top of the page I sent you. What it says about the stroke comes in handy, and I learned a lot about the ogonek when I first saw this website. A professional font tends to feature ogoneks which resemble the main shape of the letter. For example, the ogonek of 'a' should look similar to the bowl of 'a', while the ogonek for 'e' will resemble the weight distribution at the bottom left of 'e'. The only ogoneks which stay the same are the ones for the capital letters. I must say though, I really like your ogoneks even though they remain the same throughout the letters. I think it works well like it is, but particularly when you design a book typeface it will be worth remembering this information about the ogonek.

Also check this website for information about diacritics. It's an incredible source. The page I gave you before is actually linked from the 'acute' page at diacritics.typo.cz.
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:iconnymphont:
nymphont Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks for the link and for the tips, working on the diacritics and characters of other languages is a priority for me, and something I really want to focus on. I will most definitely be referring to the link you've shared with me.
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