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February 4, 2013
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Whipsmart Font by nymphont Whipsmart Font by nymphont
Whipsmart Font
Regular & Bold
By and © Lauren Thompson (NymFont/Nymphont)

Free for personal use, may be used commercially with a PayPal donation. Donate to email nymphont@yahoo.com or via the donate button on my website [link]

Contains 582 glyphs in total, including Greek & Cyrillic characters, not all shown in preview image.

Please feel free to comment, ty!

More fonts & goodies @ my blog: [link]
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:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2013  Professional General Artist
Really beautiful design. It's charming, playful and clean. I really like the variety in stroke weight.

A couple of things I would personally change though:
f - shorten the ascender and lower the bar
G - extend the horizontal stroke inwards a bit more
R - let the leg extend a bit further outward
r - extend the arm a little bit
t - extend the bar a little bit
? - make the bottom a little bit more neutral
% - make the circles a bit smaller

Many of the symbols also seem a bit too perfect (i.e. not enough variety in the stroke weight), and the kerning is a bit too tight.

These issues aside, I think this might be my favorite font of yours so far.
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:iconnymphont:
nymphont Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
"These issues aside, I think this might be my favorite font of yours so far."

Thank you so much! That means a lot me.

I think you were able to hone in on the areas of weakness in this design. I was eager to complete this, probably too eager. In my haste I failed to give several aspects the consideration and attention I should have. One such area is the general "perfectness," you mention. I know just what you mean. Take the 'L' for example, it's perfect;y flat, it could benefit from extending the angle below the baseline a bit perhaps, or not being a perfect 90 degrees. This "perfectness," does not relate to the other "quirky" and hand-tooled qualities of the design.

The uppercase 'R' has been gnawing at me, I was hoping for some feedback on it, so thank you for the confirmation there.

I really appreciate your other recommendations as well (f, G, r, t, ?, and %). I will definitely put them into practice and utilize them when I update the design again. Which I might just do in a bit here. I'll keep you posted, we'll see how it turns out!
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:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2013  Professional General Artist
Well, I called them "issues" but to be fair, I'm not quite sure to which extent it's a matter of opinions. I personally think the rhythm should be quite consistent, so letters like /r and /t shouldn't be too condensed. However, there are a few things I do which I don't really see in other typefaces. For example, in most serif typefaces the /r has quite a long arm, but I usually go for a relatively short arm to reduce the amount of negative space underneath the arm, and I also extend the right base serif to fill a bit more of that negative space and give the /r a counter balance. I like to imagine my letters to be statues which fall over if the base isn't big enough. I usually make my /L quite condensed to reduce the negative space in the top right. With the /F I often lower the bar a bit more than in /E and I extend the right base serif a bit, just like /r. I never actually learned to do these things and I don't consciously remember seeing it in other typefaces, but I think these are good tricks to balance the letters out. Sometimes I have to make a choice between what's technically correct and what's optically correct. Unfortunately what's optically correct can be very subjective.

I think you slightly misunderstood about the perfectness. I think the letters look great the way they are. It's the brackets, plus sign and other symbols and punctuation which look too clean to me compared to the letters.

By the way, could it be that your 4 is a little too dark? Perhaps if you turn the design upside down you can better judge the general weight. Somehow when you recognize the letter you fail to see what's wrong with it. I know this principle of turning the letters upside down works with kerning. I've never used it to judge the general weight before, but I can imagine it works. perhaps also have a look at the top of the M. M and W often become too dark because the strokes connect at such a sharp angle, so perhaps some very subtle ink traps would do the letter good.
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:iconnymphont:
nymphont Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Actually, I put all of the techniques you describe in general practice too, they make sense, you know? One I hadn't considered is lowering the bar in the F, though.

This design has a lot of inconsistencies. I just delved into it again, did some work on the R, t, and f, but came to a road block when contemplating how to manage it's other issues, how to handle it's inconsistent personality... So much to be done, it may spawn an entirely new typeface. Sigh...

The horizontal crossbar of the 4 does appear heavy, should be thinned and I think that might do the trick. The W doesn't seem to be an issue in Whipsmart, but now I can see that the M is top-heavy. Thanks for sharing your insights and helping me to see this design from a different perspective, it is so helpful to making a design better!
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:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2013  Professional General Artist
Nah the W is not too dark in Whipsmart, but it's a letter which often does become too dark.

As for the 4, I was thinking the whole glyph is a bit too dark, but it might just be the rendering. I hate when you design a thin typeface and some of the vertical strokes render as double the weight of other strokes. I thought in 2013 funny business like that would be solved by now.

You're welcome about the feedback. I stare at my own designs so long eventually I just get used to all the flaws and I need a second pair of eyes to point these flaws out to me. Criticism might be more important in type design than any other design field. It's no fun getting criticism after the font is released though. That's why I upload so many images of the progress of my typefaces.
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:iconnymphont:
nymphont Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
"You're welcome about the feedback. I stare at my own designs so long eventually I just get used to all the flaws and I need a second pair of eyes to point these flaws out to me. Criticism might be more important in type design than any other design field. "

Precisely.

" It's no fun getting criticism after the font is released though. "

This is true in most cases, but in most cases criticism is not as constructive, informed, or genuine. Even with my works finished, I can appreciate the insights you share! I have resisted the temptation, though, to ask, "Where were you when I was making this?" ;P

"That's why I upload so many images of the progress of my typefaces."

Wise. ;)
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:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2013  Professional General Artist
Well, next time when you're working on a typeface, don't hesitate to ask me for feedback. It should certainly smooth the process if you can get feedback during the design process rather than after its release.

"That's why I upload so many images of the progress of my typefaces."

Wise.

I suppose so, but it would help if people actually bothered to comment. But type is just not very big here on dA and I'm actually not on dA for criticism on my typefaces; when I need serious criticism I show my work to the Typophile forum or to type designers on Facebook. Also, the fact that I upload many progress pictures makes my gallery rather messy. I think when I release Dion Sans Pro I will create a new folder in my gallery called "Released typefaces" to make a distinction between finished and unfinished type.
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